Is The Moral Behind The Film Still Relevant Today?

The film "The Merchant of Venice" sports an impressive cast, including Al Pacino, Jeremy Irons, Joseph Fiennes and Lynn Collins. Several of the performers in Michael Radford's adaptation of the William Shakespeare play have won Academy Awards or have received nominations for their performances in their careers. Pacino is perhaps the most famous name in "The Merchant of Venice," as this legendary star has been honored with eight Oscar nominations, winning one time for "Scent of a Woman" in 1993. Other notable films starring Pacino include "The Godfather," "Dog Day Afternoon, Direct Television Packages," and "Glengarry Glen Ross." British actor Irons has also received several nominations in his distinguished career, winning an Academy Award for his lead performance in "Reversal of Fortune" in 1990. Irons received several awards for his portrayal of Claus von Bülow, including a Golden Globe. Other notable works by Irons includes "The French Lieutenant's Woman," "Dead Ringers," and "Brideshead Revisited," a BBC miniseries. Though Fiennes is the youngest of the three main stars of "Venice," he has racked up an impressive list of nominations in his short career, including several nominations for his work in "Shakespeare in Love." That film did win an Academy Award for Best Picture in 1999.
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How Does This Film Shape Up To Shakespeare’s Ideals

The recent film "The Merchant of Venice" is a great film to be sure, but not necessarily one that lines up with Shakespeare's original vision. While it does lift the script almost entirely wholesale, the feeling of the movie is very different. This can be attributed to one major point - Shylock.

If the movie fails to honor Shakespeare's ideals, it is in Shylock. The character is certainly the protagonist of the film, even if he was a semi-sympathetic antagonist in the original play. This choice has quite a bit to do with the changing times - the character of " the Jew" in Shakespeare's era was a default villain, while that portrayal today would seem like simple anti-Semitism. The fact that the role is played by such a fantastic actor helps to cement him at the movie's center.


Aside from the treatment of Shylock, the film does stand up remarkably well with Shakespeare - for good or for ill. Like the original work, the film is remarkably uneven. Comedy and tragedy seem to switch about at random, just as in the play. The end of the film will likely be unsatisfying to anyone who has not read the original work, a feeling echoed by anyone who has seen the stage production or simply read the play. The movie itself is a great reminder that not every work of Shakespeare will hold up to modern sensibilities, even as it does justice to what is assuredly a work of art.
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What Message The Director Wanted To Convey In The Film

Merchant of Venice is a movie that was originally written by William Shakespeare. It was adapted into a movie in 2004 and directed by Michael Radford. The movie takes place in the 16th century and is a romantic tale. The casts includes Al Pacino, Jeremy Irons and Lynn Collins. Jeremy Irons plays Antonio who must obtain a loan from Al Pacino who plays Shylock. Shylock is a Jewish moneylender that Antonio despises.

The director, Michael Radford, is a British screenwriter and director. He studied acting at Britain's National Film and Television School. He is best known for his adaption of George Orwell's hit novel, 1984. Radford directed Richard Burton in this film and it was his last. Radford directed his first play in 2000. He has been nominated for two Academy Awards and won 17 other awards for his films and plays.

Radford was born in New Delhi, India in 1946. Merchant of Venice is believed to have been written by William Shakespeare sometime within the years 1596 through 1598. The screenplay was adapted into a silent film by Lois Weber in 1914. Weber became the first woman in America to direct a feature film that was also a full-length film.
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Candid Thoughts – The Merchant of Venice

Just because you are a fan of something doesn't mean that you can't, on occasion, get a little critical of it. And, just because we made this unofficial fan site, doesn't mean we can't look at the film objectively for what it is.

What do we really think about The Merchant of Venice when you get right down to it?

Well, obviously we still love the film and we've already spoken at great length about some of the different aspects of it. However, sure, there are some things we wish could have been done differently or better.

For one thing, it seemed like Al Pacino could have used a few notes when portraying one of the most important characters in the work. If you're going to play Shylock, you need to do it right or not at all. That's like not properly casting Iago in Othello - you just don't do it.

And, even we have to admit that the tone of the film was almost schizophrenic. At times, it felt like the directors really weren't sure if they were making an earnest drama or a comedy and that's a real problem with Shakespearian adaptations.

None of this, however, is to say you shouldn't still see it. Just that you wouldn't necessarily want to own it. And, no, we aren't condoning piracy. Just rent it or look it up on Netflix or on Demand. Sites and providers such as www.Cable.TV, for one, have tons of movie channels that run these and you could find it there. If not, try RedBox.
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Location Of Famous Scenes Shot In The Film

We all have our favorite movies scenes, whether it be from old but classic hits like "Romeo and Juliet" or new favorites like "The Notebook". Either way, there are so many classic movie scenes that have impacted and inspired millions of people across the world, becoming some of the most famous scenes shot in the film industry. Here are a few of the most famous scenes shot in film from the past:

1.In the seven year itch, famous icon Marilyn Monroe stands over a pothole as her white dress blows up in the wind. This famous seen was shot in New York City, just above the subway.

2.Nothing is more exciting than Popeye Doyle in his famous car chasing scene in the movie "The French Connection". It's thrilling and famous for insane action. This famous scene was also filmed in New York, right in a Manhattan subway.

3.From the recent and loved movie Mission: Impossible - Ghost Protocol, we see an intense fight involving hand to hand combat. Whats different about this scene from other action scenes was that it was shot 130 floors high on a New York Building. This scene ended with big bad getting thrown out the window.
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Location Of Famous Scenes Shot In The Film

We all have our favorite movies scenes, whether it be from old but classic hits like "Romeo and Juliet" or new favorites like "The Notebook". Either way, there are so many classic movie scenes that have impacted and inspired millions of people across the world, becoming some of the most famous scenes shot in the film industry. Here are a few of the most famous scenes shot in film from the past:

1.In the seven year itch, famous icon Marilyn Monroe stands over a pothole as her white dress blows up in the wind. This famous seen was shot in New York City, just above the subway.

2.Nothing is more exciting than Popeye Doyle in his famous car chasing scene in the movie "The French Connection". It's thrilling and famous for insane action. This famous scene was also filmed in New York, right in a Manhattan subway.

3.From the recent and loved movie Mission: Impossible - Ghost Protocol, we see an intense fight involving hand to hand combat. Whats different about this scene from other action scenes was that it was shot 130 floors high on a New York Building. This scene ended with big bad getting thrown out the window.
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How Anti-semitism Themes Are Portrayed Throughout The Storyline

William Shakespeare's The Merchant of Venice has long been controversial to modern readers due to its perceived anti-Semitism with the antagonist, Shylock, a Jew who is ultimately cheated and forced to convert to Christianity. Readers often debate how much Shylock is meant to be read as sympathetic; Jewish director Michael Radford, for his part, views him as Shakespeare's first tragic hero, and chose this interpretation for his 2004 film adaptation.

The movie, unlike the original play, opens with scenes of Jews being thrown into the river, with text that describes the anti-Semitism of the period. Shylock (played by Al Pacino) watches the scene from the crowd, as does his rival, Antonio (Jeremy Irons). The plot largely proceeds as normal from there, but with special attention to Shylock as his suffering, as well as his daughter Jessica's abandonment, leads him on a quest for revenge against the Christian majority. (It is notable that Shylock is actually listed first in the movie's cast.) The movie ends with another added scene demonstrating how, as a convert, Shylock is forced to leave the community of the Jewish ghetto. The result is a story where bigotry and his own vengeance ultimately doom him.
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Shylock: Is He A Victim Or Villain?

The Merchant of Venice's Shylock is one of William Shakespeare's most interesting characters, and portrayals of him have varied greatly throughout the years. Older performances tended to make him pure villain: an evil, greedy moneylender and forbidding father who deserved to lose everything he had at the end. However, recent portrayals make him a sympathetic character, portraying him more as a victim, whose constant mistreatment ends in him being publicly humiliated and mocked more than ever.

Shylock certainly becomes a more interesting character when treated as a well-rounded character rather than pure evil. He gets to deliver one of the most moving Shakespearean monologues - the famous "Hath not a Jew eyes?" speech. He uses it to point out that he is no less human than the Christians around him, and if he mistreats them it is only because he has been mistreated first and learned it from them.

The play has been accused of antisemitism, but Shakespeare's treatment of Shylock is surprisingly human. When most Jewish characters were portrayed as greedy and deceptive caricatures in Elizabethan England, Shakespeare gives Shylock very believable, very personal motivation. Modern versions of the work use that motivation to portray a victimized Shylock with justifiable emotions and desires, rather than a villainous one who just seeks to destroy.
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Film Critics Reflections On The Movie

Film critics' reflections on the movie Merchant in Venice literally has laughter rolling down theater aisle ways while sweeping in a serious anti-Semitic undertone most moviegoers will not be cognizant of due to rampant hooligans. Shakespeare's Merchant in Venice tackles the issues regarding prejudice with a comical flair Parents are strongly urged to leave the little ones at home. This movie is better suited to more adult crowds due to its extremely mature content. An "X" rating would be better suited toward this interpretation of Shakespeare's beloved play.

. Audiences will be thrilled to meet familiar characters once again interpreted in new ways by the actors and actresses.The full explanation can be found at http://turnstylenews.com/2012/06/18/review-speed-merchant-of-venice/ Sly Shylock as the considerately evil villain we all love to hate. The movie's innocent merchant Antonio at whim of mercy for things beyond his control. Let us not forget the precociously rich heiress Portia the unlikely heroine who is beguiling as she is clever to outmaneuver Shylock. Character Bassanio is the brave and unwavering gentleman in love with Portia. It could be said that he is foolishly in love. The end message of the movie may lie in that love truly does win out in the end by staying true to one's heart.
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Famous Oscar Winners With Roles In The Film

The film "The Merchant of Venice" sports an impressive cast, including Al Pacino, Jeremy Irons, Joseph Fiennes and Lynn Collins. Several of the performers in Michael Radford's adaptation of the William Shakespeare play have won Academy Awards or have received nominations for their performances in their careers.

Pacino is perhaps the most famous name in "The Merchant of Venice," as this legendary star has been honored with eight Oscar nominations, winning one time for "Scent of a Woman" in 1993. Other notable films starring Pacino include "The Godfather," "Dog Day Afternoon," and "Glengarry Glen Ross."

British actor Irons has also received several nominations in his distinguished career, winning an Academy Award for his lead performance in "Reversal of Fortune" in 1990. Irons received several awards for his portrayal of Claus von Blow, including a Golden Globe. Other notable works by Irons includes "The French Lieutenant's Woman," "Dead Ringers," and "Brideshead Revisited," a BBC miniseries.

Though Fiennes is the youngest of the three main stars of "Venice," he has racked up an impressive list of nominations in his short career, including several nominations for his work in "Shakespeare in Love." That film did win an Academy Award for Best Picture in 1999.

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